The Sunday Salon–more than a beauty parlor?

We didn’t really know what to call this aspect of The Front Porch. For most Texans, salon conjures up an image of the “beauty parlour”, though its primary meaning has more to do with being a place to receive and entertain guests, or a periodic gathering of people who want to educate themselves through good conversation, or a gallery for showing beautiful art.

Actually, beauty parlour might fit, if we can get beyond the curlers and allow our real intent for the 6pm Sunday Salon to shine through: to dwell together in dialogue each Sunday evening with a diverse group of other people in a way that is, well, beautiful.

Truth be known, we want to create the time and space every Sunday at 6pm to give voice to what we think is an intrinsic human desire for…beauty!  It turns out to be very difficult, however, to talk about this without talking about things spiritual and even religious—things like hunger, brokenness, hope, faith, God, light, worship, and love.

We realize these are loaded subjects for many of us, which makes this an inherently risky enterprise.

But we think it’s worth trying to do, if only because we know there are enough folks out there who tire of the violence of the divisive monologue, or grieve the banality of much conventional religious expression, or who simply long, as philosopher David Bentley Hart describes it, for a beauty that “crosses every boundary… and so manifests the God who transcends every division—including that between the transcendent and the immanent” (The Beauty of the Infinite, p. 21).

How we do it remains to be seen. What we know for certain is we can’t do it alone.

So call it what you will: a postmodern worship service, an emergent/alternative Christian faith community, a place to explore the meaning of life with fellow questers, or whatever. We are calling it, for now, The Sunday Salon.

 

 

Welcome to the Front Porch


We are creating a café and event space in the heart of Austin to gather people from all walks of life for conversation, entertainment, inspiration, and service.  We hope to inspire each other and creatively engage the ideas and issues that impact our community.

Weekly Gatherings at Victory Grill, East Austin

We are setting sail. Beginning September 30th, The Front Porch begins hosting weekly gatherings and community events at the historic Victory Grill in East Austin.

Our special focus this fall is on supporting local Austin musicians who for the most part struggle mightily to support themselves, ironically, in the “live musical capital of the world.”

These Sunday evenings will be an eclectic blend of faith, food, music, and conversation. These events will be signature “Front Porch” and will be integral to growing our base of support. Our fall programming will culminate in a benefit concert during the last week in December.

We are also participating in a benefit for the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians on October 2nd, 7:30pm. That evening, we host the astonishing “Mother Falcon” in All Saints’ Episcopal Church, in an effort to help raise funds for local musicians in need of health care.

The Front Porch is a haven of hospitality, a hearth for the hungry, and a sanctuary for the wondering wanderer. Please join us! Thank you for your support!

Difference & Conversation: Articulate Thinking

This site intends to post substantial articles from time to time that may foster conversation, learning from one another, civil disagreement, and intellectual stimulation among those associated in any way with The Front Porch.

“Difference & Conversation” will be curated by Frank Richardson.

Here is the link to our first article, written by Frank himself:

FCR BLOG 9_25 – Beyond Dogmatism and Cynicism

Frank Richardson is professor (emeritus) of educational psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. He spent the first half of his career in counseling psychology, the last half of it in a field that goes by the name of theoretical and philosophical psychology. This shift occurred because he became disenchanted with much of academic and professional psychology and, as a result, has spent most of the last 25 years trying to sort out the wheat from the chaff in the social and behavioral sciences. He has published several books and over a hundred articles and chapters. Recently, with a few colleagues in theoretical psychology, he has been investigating several topics in the area of psychology and religion.